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Grocery Store Employees Classified as Emergency Workers in Two States

A Wisconsin landlord is doing what he can to help his tenants and his neighbourhood get through the coronavirus pandemic.

This week, John Zutz left a letter on his tenants' doorsteps, saying they will only need to pay $100 in rent for the month of April.

Zutz told WISN 12 News he wants to help where he can.

"I see what's happening inside the world, in the country, and I realize San Antonio News there's going to be a lot of people out of work, and they need help," said Zutz. "I'm not sure if (my tenants) need it or not. That's the point. They may not need it, but I encourage them if they don't need it, to spend the money in the neighbourhood."


"This is affecting everyone, and this is affecting me financially," Logan said. "I felt relieved, and I also felt grateful on a community level because (Zutz's) intention was to free up some money to invest back in the neighbourhood during a time of economic downturn."

Zutz said he is no saint, just a man trying to help his community and his country get back on their feet. He said he is losing about $1,000 in the deal and will need to reevaluate the situation if it lasts longer than a month.

Zutz said he hopes other landlords will see his story and do the same for their tenants if they can afford to.

In Minnesota, Governor Tim Walz included Food Distribution Press Release Distribution Services  In San Antonio Workers in a new designation of “Essential Tier 2 Workers,” alongside educators, water treatment workers and others. In Vermont, Public Safety Commissioner Michael Schirling said grocery employees, along with other food supply chain workers, would be deemed essential.

Will the rest of the country follow suit? As various outlets have reported, despite the panic buying that has made headlines, the U.S. food supply is strong. But to keep your grocery store stocked, the people who make that possible need to be supported through services like free child care so they can work while their families are at home during school closures.

These stores have adapted quickly to serve communities across the country, through initiatives like “elderly hours” for high-risk communities, so it only makes sense that the national and state governments adapt to serve these workers.

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